Home
Look Here !
About
Contact Us
Club Location & Details
Club Calendar
Membership
Junior Members
News
Oystercat
Oystercat Skippers
Mumbles Belle Calendar
Oystercat Calendar
Oystercat Fishing Info.
Boat  Booking Form
Fishing Reports
Fishing Forecasts
Weather Forecasts
Tide Information
Local Tides
Tide Tables
Conservation
Min. Fish Sizes
Events & Competitions
Shore Fishing Calendar
Minibus Booking Form
Competition Rules
Club-Away Fishing Trips
Fishing Marks
Google Fish Marks
Sea Fish Species
Sea Safety
Boat Fishing
Boating Knots
Shore Fishing
Fishing Knots
Fishing Rigs
Fishing Bait
Fishing Tips
Tackle Shops Discount
Preparing Fish Tecniques
Fish Recipes
Photo Gallery
RYA Training Course
Skill Centre
Internet Links
Club History
Grapevine
Sponsors Links
Download
Holiday Chalet75
Forum
PAKA
e-mail me

Fishing Marks


Introduction

 

Swansea Bay and the  Seas of Gower

Swansea bay and Gower have a long sea angling tradition, with many small motor boats based in the marina or local moorings and shore marks.  Anglers are spoilt for choice when it comes to deciding which species to target.  Popular options include uptiding over the many sandbanks for rays, turbot, bass, tope or smoothhound, reef fishing for bass, pollack, wrasse, black bream and trigger fish, and drifting a live sandeel for bass.  General mixed ground fishing and even wrecking on certain tides are other options.

West of Mumbles Head, the shore angler is faced with one of the most beautiful and productive areas of coast to be found anywhere in the UK.  Bass are one of the most popular species here and are caught from late spring right through until winter.  There are many rock marks, and the fishing at Port Eynon and Worm's Head is about as good as it gets, whether you favour lure fishing or legering a succulent peeler crasb at short range in the rock gullies.   Llangennith, Cefn Sidan and Pendine are three classic, west facing surf beaches that in addition to bass produce plenty of flounders and golden-grey mullet.  There is also the vast expanse of the Loughor estuary, good for flounders.

Google Shore Fishing Maps  Flash Earth Images of Swansea Bay


Boat Fishing Marks

 

Boat Fishing Marks - Swansea Bay

The grounds off Swansea is a mix of clean sand and mud, rough ground patches, reefy ground consisting of coral, and further out undulating sand banks.  The beauty of Swansea is that most of the popular marks are within Swansea Bay itself and only a short boat ride of maybe 20 minutes is required to reach the prime fishing grounds.  Just long enough to tackle up before arriving for a good day's fishing.  It's not just boat fishing, there are a variety of fishing opportunities to suit anglers of all abilities. Big bass is the key target throughout the angling year, especially through the summer and autumn months.

Swansea Marina is well located for the best of the all-round boat fishing.  You can run straight out and and East towards the muddy  caused by the strong tides, and take a multitude of species bottom fishing.  Or, as many of the boats now do, head due west and straight out into open Atlantic, where clearer water means other predatory species in the deep water.  Conger, ling, pollack, and blue shark.  Tight lines all round.

The Gower peninsular, which is good a fishing area as well as some magnificent scenery from the sea as well as the land, is within easy boating  distance. The dark black numbers on the charts above and below relate to the numbers/marks in the lists below.  The positions are only approximate and should not be used for navigational purposes.

1. Inner & Outer Green Grounds one of the more popular areas which gives some of the bigger post Christmas cod.  This lies out towards Mumbles at the outer edge of Swansea Bay itself and is made up of mixed ground amongst sand.

2, White Oyster Ledge is another noted area.  This is a deep gutter running parallel with the shore on a line set between Langland Bay and Pwlldu Head with a depth up to 100ft.  The tide run here can be a bit difficult and few boats bother to work this area in anything over medium sized tides.

25. Kenfig Patches to the south-east, is again sand but can hold turbot to 4lbs with the occasional 10lb plus fish and quality rays.

3. Scarweather Sands are a more distant rated location, a good bass and ray mark.  This is a vast shoal of sandbanks that lie in a line of ridges creaed by the rip tides, about a three miles in length.  It is marked by buoys, and even though in mid-channel, it can dry out at low water by some 8ft, droping away to around 100ft either side.  Having such a constructive natural bank right in the middle of a spring ebb tide can make it a death trap for the unwary, so take care.  On neap tides in fair weather try dropping the anchor at the lower end of the bank, in about 40ft of water.  This is usually a good shot for the main predator of the sandbanks, the Small-Eyed rays and unfortunately, dogfish.  The 'Swansea Wrap' is a good bait to try here.  Its a bait combo of a large Launce that is carefully wrapped in a piece of  squid, held in place with elasticated thread.  Skippers have known the banks to produce up to 20 Small Eyed ray in a day's fishing, with weights running from 7lb up to 12lbs.  But, if the rays are not taking the bait during you trip, head for the Mixon Bank.

4. Offshore Wrecks can give excellent fishing (Pollack) at times with fish well in to double figures.  This can be a high summer sport, and the wrecks also produce out of season cod, huss, and big conger.  The wrecks are not normally targeted in late winter periods due to the weather, but you have to wonder just how big some of the resident cod grow to on these.

Other Marks

St. Christopher Knoll: Just past Mumbles Head towards Worms Head.  The superb coast land scenery can be ejoyed during the boat trip, live stock on the cliffs, tiny figures of people walking one of the most famous coastal paths in Europe.  Also, passing small boats trolling lures in the hope of catch, such is the enthusiasm of the anglers in the Swansea Bay area.  The mark is well known for Rays and Smoothhounds.  Try uptiding with squid and lug cocktails or sandeel.  Or downtide, with peeler crab or ragworm.

Mixon Bank: located right out side the Mumbles Head lighthouse.  The Mixon dries out on low water spring and must be treated with respect, especially  on an ebb tide, when the natural flow of the Bristol Channel is boosted by the waters of Swansea Bay emptying past the Mumbles Head.  Marked by a buoy, the bank drops away to 100ft on the outside, and around 50ft on the inside.  When fishing on the top of neap the depth is about 25ft and there is enough flow to make it fishable.  We've hooked rays on uptide sandeel and it's not unusual to get several Small Eyed in a session.

Stombus (Inner & Outer):

Whiteshell Point

Slade:

Langland Point

Langland Reef (inner & outer bream marks

Pwlldu Point

Oxwich Point

Oxwich Bank

Paviland Reef

Mumbles moorings

Diamond Bank

Spoil Grounds

Helwick Bank

 


Shore Fishing Marks

 

Shore Fishing Marks - Around Gower

5. Swansea Breakwater for summer and autumn rays, whiting, dabs, codling, pouting and the odd bass. (Permission required from ABP.  SWWASAC members can fish there in SWWASAC organised competitions).

6. Sea Front Path. On the top half of the tide it is possible to fish on mixed ground.  Legering is a favoured method and the mixed ground is not generally rough enough to cause problems. In summer, worm baits will attract the occassional school bass and eel. Ground baiting mullet, especially near to weed beds. In autumn there is always a chance of bigger bass when pouting pass through.  In winter, codling and whiting, especially after dark.

7. Knab Rock located to the west of the concrete boat-launching slip and is popular with holiday anglers. In summer, mackerel are often caught by youngsters fishing with feathers or fish strips under float. The top half of the tide is best, as fish pass through on their way into the bay.  Bass, occasional plaice and mackerel, accompanied by garfish are the main species, yet in hot summers triggerfish and black bream have been taken. In winter, codling and whiting are frequently taken after dark.

8. Mumbles Pier (currently closed for repair) is normally good for summer bass, garfish, mackerel, plaice (maybe), gurnard, flatties pollack, conger and trigger fish.  In winter it offers whiting, dabs, pouting and codling, plus numbers of dogfish.   There is always a chance of good bass to fresh mackerel bait. Try close-in near to the metalwork with smaller baits for black beam, triggerfish and even the odd red mullet.  A charge of £3 per rod is made for entry  and it closes at sunset.  The separate lower level at the end of the pier is kept for fishing only.

16. Mumbles Island/Tutt Head. The head with its lighthouse is a rough-ground mark with swift flowing tides.  You need to fish at low water but you can easily be cut off on the fast tide. It is a rocky promontory that affords access to a decent depth of water even at low tide.  Take care! Don't fish alone and always take your mobile.  This area is accessible for about two hours either side of low water.  Spinning is a popular method that is used and casting into the gulleys will produce good bass.  Float fishing the sheltered eddies with live prawn or crab can be great fun on warm calm evenings.  A good evening with light tackle can produce many a tight line.  The seaward sides produce fine surf conditions in all but northerly winds.  There are large areas of thick weed with the exception of the outer sound-that stretch of water that isolates the island at high water from the remainder of Mumbles Head.  You can expect to catch bass, cod, dogfish, wrasse, rockling, conger eels.  Bull huss, gurnard, some mackerel, pollock, angler fish and monkfisk have also been encountered.  Scad can be around when the mackerel are shoaling well.

Bottom fishing produces good results but for the best catches ledger with soft or peeler crab or strips of mackerel, herring or squid on the east and south shores.  When bottom fishing keep the terminal rig simple, one hook and a rotten bottom with a substitute weight, if you are to retrieve  your tackle.

Spinning is good in the waters of the outer sound.  First light tends to be the most productive using simple rubber eels.  The choice of colours depend on the lighting and water colourisation but red generally works well. Mackerel spinners and any of the wobblers will also take fish.  Always try to retrieve your lure against the tidal flow, and slowly.  Try varying the depth, by raising and lowering the rod to encourage any shy feeders.

Float fishing in any of the gullies that abound on the south and west sides can be very good.  Soft and peeler crabs or strips of mackerel produce good quality fish.  Try not to fish too deeply, allow the bait to wash around in the swill of the breaking surf.  Many bass feed here in just 9-12 inches of foaming, swirling white water.

Do not fish here in winter.

9. Bracelet Bay which is just beyoud the coastguard station with its patches of sand enclosed by rocks can produce good bass.  The rocks can be fished from the left or right-hand side.  Spinning or plugging on a rising tide on calm, sultry evening is good for bass, and float-fished crab might tempt a triggerfish.  Legering into the sandy gulleys after dark with fish baits for conger is possible but pulley rigs with rotten bottoms are advisable.  Don't fish when the wind is strong because the sea can get very rough in the corner.  See also above for Mumbles Head, same location.

10. Footpath to Langland starts from Bracelet Bay and follows the coastal path west to Langland.  There are many rocky bays along the path where it is possible to spin or float fish for the species previously mentioned. Some are easy to reach, others need care when climbing down.   All have good depth of water at low tide.  Heavy on tackle when bottom fishing, but now most of the seabed is beginning to flatten out and much of the bedrock is clear clear of the really heavy weed.  Do not fish this area when the sea is rough because the big waves will pull you in.  You have a good chance of a reasonable black beam in August and September.  Small pollack and wrasse will also give good sport.  During the winter months some fine codling can be caught but if there is a fresh wind blowing this sweep of the coastline produces large swells and getting close to the water can be dangerous.

If you enjoy spinning then this is a good place to be.  Again late evening is the best time; red gills, rubber eels, mackerel spinners and tobies all catch fish.  Pollock are common and 3 - 4lb fish have been taken.  Casting and retreiving with a pumping action can attract the pollock.  Some of the promontories provide sufficient depth to allow the use of a set of feathers.  Bottom fish with crab or large bunches of lugworm, especially for codling.

11. Rotherslade and Langland BayRotherslade, or little Langland, has a lonely lump of rock that becomes and island for an hour or two at high water.  It can be worth fishing the sea-ward side, once a 12lb bass was caught.

Langland is well known for its surf conditions, so you have to pick your tide to be sure of a treat.  From the beach you are likely to land bass, dabs and maybe plaice.  Dogfish are a bit sporadic.   Langland point is a useful promotory with deep water right up to its edge and some sandy patches within casting distance.  This mark provide sport from bass, mackerel, garfish, wrasse, gurnards, dogfish, some plaice and dabs.

Beach fishing just when it is getting dark here is nice. Try two hooks, one above your weight/sinker so that it rises just off the sand, baited with lugworm and you will likely catch bass in the surf, just with a gentle cast.  Try a longer cast to the bait amongst the dabs and plaice.

From the rocks of Langland point try bottom fishing with soft and peeler crab for bass, gurnard and dogfish.  Some of the larger plaice can show up here so use a long distance cast baited with lug. Chuck it out to reach the larger areas of sand.

Look out for shoals of whitebait that can hug the rocks here and spin using a silver wobbler, especially the ones with a red bead in the body.  Use  a rubber eel if you there at dusk.  Should you want some fun with light tackle, bait with lugworm or a small piece of fresh mackerel and float fish for wrasse at the rock's edge.  A water depth of 10 to 12ft is normally productive.

 12. Caswell Bay. A magnificant bay with truely golden sands.  This beach produces its best catches late in the year.  At high water there is comfortable fishing to be had off the rocks of the bay's eastern side.  On a calm day with the tide out there is bound to be powerful surf conditions.  To avoid the holiday makers fish after dark or in October and November.  Bass, mackerel, pollack, plaice, dabs and a few turbot have been caught in Caswell Bay.

Fish the surf after dark with a two hook rig baited with lugworm.  Have both hooks flowing above the weight, long casting is not normally required but if fishing late in the year use squid bait and put it out at the furthest breaker.  The best area of the beach for this is the extreme right hand corner.

From August onwards on the rocky point to the left of the bay try for plaice, dabs and turbot.  Add few small clam to the lugworm to liven thing up and use a 3 hook terminal rig.  A 20 yard cast puts the bait onto unbroken sand.

Along the remaining rocks of Caswell's eastern shore bottom fishing with soft or peeler crab should tempt the bass.  The further east one goes spinning with a red rubber eel will also find the bass, while a mackerel spinner or small wobbler will find pollack and mackerel.

The highest point of the eastern rocks provides a fine promontory for spinning, feathering or float fishing.  It's steep and difficult to climb down, especially in wet weather, but with care it can be well worth the effort.  Use a mackerel spinner or feathers for some good tight lines.  Also try float fishing with crab, for bass, in the swill of water from the waves as they break against the rocks.  The depth of water needs to be no more than 5ft.   Bait with a strip of fresh mackerel for the pollack at a depth of 10 to 12ft.  The bedrock here is virtually flat but is criss-crossed by gullies and crevices that are full of seaweed.  It could be worth a session in winter months for codling provided the sea will allow you to get close enough to the water's edge. Be very careful - because of its depth and exposed position it doesn't take much of a wind to produce a large swell.

17. Brandy Cove,

Brandy Cove is a little known beach to the west of Caswell Bay.  It is a small cove with vast expanses of rock on either side and, at first glance at low water, it looks an ideal venue for bass. It certainly is. The optimum time to fish for bass is over low water, night fishing is often the most productive.

Bass can be caught here from April through to November. Other summer species include wrasse, pollack, rockling, conger eels, black bream and trigger fish. Plaice and other flatfish can be caught over the sandy patches and the small beach.  Few anglers fish here throughout the winter, though if they did they would almost certainly be rewarded with whiting, codling and probably a few late bass.

Leger peeler crab at short range in the deeper gullies. Try lure fishing at high water. A standard beach rod and reel can be used, but you may prefer a bass rod or spinning gear.

18. Pwll Du Bay.  A cracking good beach, with deep water and horseshoe like in shape.  At the eastern edge a freshwater stream runs into the sea under a ridge of pebbles.  Access is by walking, and it is quite a long trak.  Easy enough walk, just a long one.  Species abound here, mackerel, pollack, plaice, dabs, dogfish, gurnards, conger eels, cod, thornback rays etc.  Even tope have caught.

From the beach a gentle cast will put the bait into quite deep water at high tide.  Two hooks fished on the bottom with lugworm will find the dabs and plaice.  When mackerel are shoaling try spinning from the beach.  On the east side there are many gullies worth float fishing for bass with soft crab bait.  The west side known as the needles holds the greatest promise.  Even at low tide the water is deep just 20yds out.  Lugworm placed on the bottom will find the dabs and plaice while a soft or peeler crab will bring in the bass.  Long casting can put bair among the thornbacks.  The same tactics on cold and crisp winter days may find the cod.

Spinning from the needles a small spoon or wobbler can produce catches of mackerel and pollack along with school bass.  First light of the day is good for mackerel and evening for pollack.

Hunts Bay.   Flat bedrock, no sand to call of, lots of weed and the whole area is criss-crossed by many shallow cracks and crevices.  No great difficulty in getting to Hunts Bay, just another long walk this time from the NT carpark at Southgate. Fine surf conditions.

Good for bass at low tide, pollack for the last hour to high water and the first hour after.  Just two methods and two baits work at Hunts Bay.  From low tide to the hour before high water use rough ground gear and ledger with crab.  Not enough depth for float fishing and the total rock seabed is only suited to soft and peeler crab.  Forget long casting, just lob the bait into the surf.  Spinning for bass and pollack is worth a try an hour before and after hugh water.  Red gills attract the bass while any silver lure seems to attract the pollack.  No great size of fish around here but good fun on light tackle.

Pobbles Bay.  A small bay and next door neighbour to Hunts Bay, but totally different with glorious sands and surf conditions in south or south westerly winds.  In the summer months popular with beach people when the sun is shining and the wind is light, not good for fishing.  The popular fishing mark is the eastern cliff and the beach.  Prodominantly flatfish.  Dabs in particular along with plaice and the occasional sole.  There are also bass, dogfish, mackerel and garfish.  When fishing from the rock mark a black bream or two may turn up.

Best to wait until the sun sets and then, if fishing from the beach, use a two or three hook nylon trace.  Bait the hooks with lugworm or ragworm for the bass and flatties.  If the sport is quiet change to a strip of mackerel and take a few dogfish.  From the rocks on the eastern side long cast using the same terminal rig for sole or float fish, using small hooks, for bream.  Aim to get the float as for from the rocks as possible.  Spinning with a mackerel spinner in late August for the mackerel and garfish.

13. Oxwich, The largest South Gower beach.  At low tide it also takes in the little cove of Tor Bay and reaches into the dangerous Tree Cliffs Bay.  Currents and undertows can be difficult in Tree Cliffs.

Oxwich itself is a spread of golden sand.  Extremely shallow inshore its greatest disadvantage is its popularity with water sports enthusiasts.  If there are a lot of people on the beach and water try the wooded Oxwich head (19) to the west of the bay.   This point stretches for about a mile out from the high water mark and has, along its length, evry type of water conditions any shore angler could wish for.  About two thirds along its length and some 200 yards offshore are the remains of a wreck worthy of fishing.  It is a long and tiring walk out to the very end of the Head for the path goes up to the very top of the hillside, then down once more, several times.  The path is easy to find and follow, just start as the path passes the 13th century village church.  Fishing from the shore is a simple affair with 2 or 3 hook nylon terminal rig.  Bait with lugworm or small, thin slivers of herring or mackerel for the dabs and plaice.  Usually, when the crowds have gone the bass come in on the flooding tide to scour the sands for titbits.

Some anglers have the view that it is probably best to fish Oxwich beach on neap tides because the water goes out quite quickly on springs.  On the western shore there are usually loads of worm casts, mussels on the rocks ect., but because the tide goes out the furthest here it needs to be fished on high water.  Then cast out as far as possible but you must try and avoid the rocks.  The water maybe a little deeper on the eastern side, probably due to being scoured by the tidal action, and requires a long cast in a roughly a south westerly direction.

19.  Oxwich Head has scope for all rock fishing techniques.  Three quarters of its length a modest cast will put terminal tackle onto sand and provide sport with the flats, dogfish, bass, gurnards, pouting ect.  From the same rocks spinning will produce mackerel and garfish.  For a change float fish for bass using crab bait or fish strips for pollock wrasse.  Generally the further along the headland you go the deeper the water, particularly on flood tides.  However, for the last quarter of its length the nature of things change.  Here the waters are shallower due to a rocky shelf that extends eastwards.  There are many gullies here and plenty of weed so make a choice between floating soft crab or placing it on the bottom for the healthy bass that feed around here.  Bait fishing on the bottom of the guliies may result in conger eels being caught.  During the winter months this section of the head is probably the best mark on Gower to fish for the cod.  Only a south or south westerly wind will produce a stormy sea. On a frosty morning with a high tide it is worth fishing the head with a 2 hook trace and fish strips for whiting.

While out there try using a second rod with heavy tackle and a large piece of mackerel or squid for bait and see if you can land thornback, monkfish, angler fish, smoothhound, blonde ray or even a tope.

14. Horton and Port EynonOne bay, two villages, two beaches.  No visible border between the two beaches, but very different fishing experiences in term of catch quality and quantity.  Horton beach produces far better surf conditions, it's steeper and deeper than Port Eynon with a swifter water flow along its shore.  There is scope for rock fishing on Horton's eastern side, but beach fishing is best.  Port Eynon to the west is shallower and slower due in part to the protection offered by the western promontory.  At the very point of this rocky arm there' good surf over hard ground.  There are also many productive gullies, but for much of its length the waters are shallow and still, sheltered from the prevailing west and south westerly winds.

Port Eynon beach has its fair share of the flatfishes but few bass.  For the bass head for the rocks to the west, it is a fine place to fish and has produed double figure catches.  Late in the season mackerel and a few pollack are around.  Wrasse, rockling and gurnards make up an interesting selection of species to fish for.

Fishing from Horton's rocks fine fishing can be had with a ledger soft or peeler crab.  Remember the ground is hard so tackle up accordingly.  Set the crab bait 18 to 24 inches above the weight to help keep the bait clear of the rough ground.  Access to the water's edge is easy so no danger involved when lifting fish.  Plenty of depth here at high water to spin for mackerel and pollack, first light being the best time.   Look for the whitebait at the rock edges and you'll find the fish.   The beach at Horton presents no problem of choice of method.  Two hooks baited with lugworm or fresh razor fish fished on the bottom for bass.  Fish 1 hook below the weight and one 12 inches above it.  You'll nee to cast a fair distance at low water but can reduce this as the tide comes in.  Horton beach is one for after dark fishing during the summer months.  For daylight fishing then fish Horton beach in April and October.

Fish in fewer numbers are to had on Port Eynon beach, but Port Eynon point, on the bay's western flank is a very good venue.

21. Port Eynon Point.  Visit at low tide.  If the day is calm and bright fish with crab bait on the very rough bottom for bass.  When the surf is breaking then float fish in one of the many gullies.  Put the bait in the back of the swill of the breaking waves and look out for big fish.  On a clam day it's worth punching out tackle baited with lugworm or smallish crab to reach the coarse sand.  Spinning will attract the mackerel and pollack, but be prepared to lose some tackle as the ground is irregular and of varying depth.

20. Slade & Fall BayNeighbours of Worm's Head that are small and clean with clear water and golden sand.  The ground is fairly easy although there are some rough patches of rock.  It is a long walk to get here and the fishing is not so good around here.  From the sands bass may be caught, respectable dabs, a few plaice, but too many dogfish.  From the rocks there is some good spinning for mackerel, garfish and a few pollack.

Try a nylon terminal trace with 2 or 3 hooks, with one below the weight and cast as far as you can to find the fish.  Lugworm, ragworm fish strips (herring or mackerel) and fresh razor fish will cover all options.   Spinning from the rocks will often catch mackerel and garfsh.

22. Worms HeadThis is the place to fish. The worm has rich and productive waters in which fish can live, grow and hunt for food.  The Worm stretches far out into the sea from the shallows of the tidal causeway to the great depth of its seaward tip.  Fishing can be over rough ground or fine, clear patches, some pure sand, some coarse and shingly.  Float, spinning and feature fishing can be enjoyed.   There are areas of powerful, pounding surf or regions of flat calm, unruffled waters.  All on the very same day.  Even fly fishing for bass is become popular at Worms Head.

You can cross the causeway  to the Worm approximately 2.5 hours either side of low water.  Local anglers have been known to go across for two or three days, sleeping under canvas, simply to take advantage of all that the Worm has to offer.  The eastern side is shallow and rocky, the western deep and sandy.  The further along you go the rocks become unsuitable for the novice and the unfamiliar.  Some of the rocks that have to be crossed, such as the Devil's Bridge which is a thin neck, of a path before the head, are truely dangerous.  The closer you get to the seaward tip the harder it becomes to reach water level.

The Worm has, can and will produce large bass.  It will also yield large pollack, conger eel, thornback, blonde rays, dabs, plaice, pouting, wrasse, gurnard, dogfish, monkfish, mackerel, scad, whiting, codling.  These together with the occasional sting ray, turbot, spur dog, sole and rockling. Don't rule out tope.  Gower's finest surf fishing for bass can be found off the causeway leading to Worm's Head.  For the tremendous surf over heavy ground use a ledger with soft or peeler crab straight into the surf.  No need for long casting, keep terminal rig basic, just nylon and a worthless weight.  No swivels, no snap links, the less there is to snag the better.

The Eastern side of the worm is generally shallower.  Where ever there is surf fish the bottom with crab.  A long cast will frequently find sand or single so fish with a 2 hook rig baited with lug or ragworm or, use mackerel strips for rays, turbot and varies dogfish.  Much of this side of the Worm has wide, flat, weed beds that have to retriived over, like the causeway tactics keep the tackle simple.

The west side offers far more scope for different forms of fishing.  Here the Worm's flanks are steeper, its waters deeper.  A good sandy bottom lies no more than 30 yards off in most areas.  Use a ledger with 3 hooks baited with either of the worms or fish strips for the flatfish and whiting especially during the winter months.  Any niche close to the water's surface will be good for float fishing close in with mackerel strips for wrasse.  Providing you don't have to lift the catch or if you don't have a drop net try the same spot for spinning.  Early morning or late evening are always more productive.  Use mackerel spinners for the mackerel and garfish and red gill, standard rubber eel (red or white) for the bass and pollack.  The areas either side of the Devil's Bridge section have produced good catches of pollack, but great care is needed to fish from here.  Not for the feint hearted.

Rhossili Ledges

Rhossili Ledges are a series of flat rock platforms situated on the northern side of the headland, which leads from Rhossili village out towards Worms Head. They are a very popular shore mark throughout the summer months, but few anglers realise just how productive they are at other times of the year, notably the latter part of winter, when few other marks in the area fish well. The ledges are one of only a handful of marks in the area which can be fished in comfort during strong easterly winds. It’s not suitable for disabled or unaccompanied junior anglers as there is a steep but safe climb down to the mark.

Rossili Bay (Worms Head, Llangennith to Burry Holmes)

This golden crescent of sand attracts more surfers than anglers.  However, at the right time and under the right conditions it is an area well worth visiting.  Pure sand for its entire length and no rough ground with in casting distance, even at low tide.  Rossili beach is a caster's paradise where the only limitation is the angler and fishing tackle.  There is no need to wade out, just go in far enough to get the bait behind the 3rd breaker.  Casting a long way out is likely to result in more flat fish than bass.  A 2 hook terminal rig is trouble free and gives scope to fish for bass or flat fish.  For bass keep the hooks above the weight and flowing into the swell behind the surf.  For flat fish put the hooks on the bottom below the weight.  The use of a long terminal hook trace will be required for attracting turbot and brill.  These fish do like to see some movement in their prospective meal.  Take care it can be a dangerous beach to those not familiar with tidal conditions that prevail.  When approaching Llangennith beach from the Hillend Caravan Park (15) there are plenty of signs warning of the fierce undertows that can sweep an unsuspecting angler away.  Pay heed to them, it can be a dangerous beach.

Summer fishing during the day can be awkward due to beach goers/surfers, head West towards rocks to avoid these. Fishes well during the day, but be prepared to don a pair of waders to get to the fish. Night fishing can be more productive but parking at Llangennith caravan park is prohibited overnight, so you have to park at the Worms Head Hotel and walk down the cliff path. Access to this is 200yds back up the road on your left, can be very exhausting on return, so travel light. Species here include: Bass, Golden Grey Mullet, Flounder, Wrasse from rock marks, occasional Rays at range. Shallow sloping beach, good Summer evening venue on light spinning gear for Bass as light fades. Standard beach gear for night fishing with 5oz plain lead, 2up 1down rig ideal. Baits: Small harbour Rag, Sandeels, Peeler, Squid, Mackerel.

Rhossili Beach

Onshore breeze high tide around early evening.  For best results fish the Rhossili end of beach 1 hour before low water to 1 hours before high tide for flounders and odd bass and dab in winter; and flounder bass gold grey mullet the odd ray and dab in summer; try all worm baits. tipped with fish after dark. Mackerel, razorfish and clams also have their day.

23 Bury Holmes

This is a small tidal island at the northern end of Lenngenith This is less rock at low water  than at Mumbles but still provides plenty of opportunity for rock fishing.  On the seaward side of the island fine surf conditions caan be found, which can be good for bass.  Enjoyable but, don't forget that it is tidal and you could be stuck there for hours if not prepared and alert.  Never try to swim or wade to the mainland should you become stranded, the current is far too pwerful even for very strong swimmers.  It is reckoned that some of the healthiest and cleanest bass are to be found along the whole of Rhossili Bay.  Dabs, plaice, flounders, turbot and brill are the other likely species to be hooked.

Broughton Bay to Whitford Point

Around the corner from Llangennith lies very difficult stretch of of coastline.  It is an area swept by fierce undertows and rip tides, wth a mixture of sand and rock with plenty of fish to be caught, but not many anglers fish here.  Fishing is mainly from the headland on the bay's eastern side.  Some fishing is done from the beach but in general it is a location best left alone, especially at low water.  Fishing from the beach is much safer at top tide.  Brought bay is more popular with the boat angler.

River Loughor

The most popular area for the locals are the greenbanks on the Llanelli side of the river.  But visiting anglers tend use the sand on both sides of the river - bottom fishing in between the road and railway bridges.  Winter can be exellent for the flounder, best bait being the local harbour ragworm.  Summer fishing for bass, mullet, or flounder try bottom or float fishing.   Beware the crabs can be a pest when the water is warmer.

The only method of fishing to be used here is a plain leger with a first choice bait of mud ragworm.  Failing these lugworm should produce good catches.  Two hooks is the simplest form and will catch many fish.  Keep both hooks below the weight so that they are on the bottom at all times.  Do not wade out as this could be dangerous should you step into a gully/pill and very often the flat fish will be behind a long distance caster.  The fish here move in with the tide as it creeps shoreward, 2lb flounders have been caught in 5 inches of water.   At the right time of the year catches can be very good with heavy bags taken.  Average fish size in some parts are over 2lb.  The village of Wernffrwd is an area that is capable of producing large bass late in the year.  Favorite bait is soft crab, ledgered close to the bottom.  Regular species include: flounders, dabs, some plaice, bass, mullet and during the winter whiting (if cold enough).  Not so regular: turbot, brill, codling, scad, mackerel, sewing

24. Port Talbot Breakwaters give opportunities for rays, bass and codling. 

26. Sker point & Rocks for rays, bass ,codling and turbot.

Many of you will have other marks that you have fished successfully, as there are many locations that are more difficult to get to for reasons of transport, or distance or remoteness.  If you have and would like to share with your fellow anglers then please drop a line with details to the Club.

Swansea Bay and Gower offer a treasure chest of sport.  Over 20 major centres, 25 different species common to shore fishing and each year something out of the ordinary turns up.

Contributions

Knab Rock

 Knab Rock Mumbles

Just outside The Mumbles in Swansea Bay and can be fished from the comfort of your car

Main Species
Whiting, codling, dab, pouting, bass, dogfish, gurnard, strap conger, plaice, mackerel, garfish, trigger fish

Recommended Baits:
Lugworm, ragworm, mackerel, peeler crab

River Lougher Swa Fishing Mark

A good mark for an evening's fishing with plenty of flats and the crabs not so much a problem. However, parking can be a bit of a nightmare at this venue on a good tide

Burry Port Harbour Breakwater

Burry Port Harbour

Summer: try float fishing close in or down side of harbour walls for mullet size 2 or smaller hooks ragworm pieces.  Winter: fish 3 hook paternoster rig ragworm or small blow lug dont have to cast far for flounder. whiting after dark S.West winds best.

Pendine Beach Sea Fishing Mark

Pendine Beach in South Wales.

One of the classic Welsh storm beaches, fishes best following a good onshore blow with reasonable surf and a tinge of colour in the water

Main Species
Flounders, bass, dogfish, a few silver eels, golden-grey mullet

Recommended Baits:
Harbour rag, black lug, razorfish, cockles, butterfish, clams, sandeel

Directions Follow the M4 west to its end and then continue on the A48 to Carmarthen. Cross the River Towy and turn left onto the A40 towards Pembroke Dock. Pendine is signposted off to the left at St Clears
Season Flounder from October to New Year and into spring and summer, bass in spring, autumn and early winter, spring and summer for other species

Bendrick Rocks

The Bendrick Rock is a popular shore venue located between Sully Bay and Barry Docks, with something to offer the sea angler throughout the entire year.

SPECIES

In addition to cod and whiting throughout autumn and winter, expect conger eels, dogfish, rockling, silver eels, bass, flounders, and the occasional thornback ray and mullet if fishing from spring through until well into the autumn.

BAIT & TACKLE

A cocktail of black lug and squid is a good all-round cod bait, while both ragworms and lugworms will catch plenty of codling. Use mackerel for the whiting.

Fish, squid and sandeels work well for conger eels, rays and dogfish, while floatfishing a live prawn or sandeel is effective for bass. Floatfish bread over groundbait for mullet.

It is possible to fish from the Bendrick throughout the tide, but limit yourself to the smaller tides if you intend fishing over high water. Choose tides less than 12.5m Barry scale. If you do plan on staying at the rock over high tide, ensure the weather forecast is perfect.

Most anglers concentrate their efforts here fishing over the low-water period on the larger tides from three hours after high to two after low. The best rig to fish this rough-ground venue is a pulley rig incorporating a rotten bottom. The design of this rig ensures that when a fish is hooked, the lead weight, if it is not already lost, is held high in the water, clear of the many snags.


GETTING THERE

Follow the A4267 coast road from Penarth to Sully or from Barry towards the nearby chemical works, using either the A4055 or A4231. There is a small roundabout near the chemical works entrance. Take the coast road  (Hayes Road) past the access point for Sully slipway, and then to the children’s hospital. Turn left at the next roundabout and keep left until you arrive alongside a disused factory adjacent to the rock.


Species and Bait

 

SPECIES

During autumn and winter expect dabs, whiting, pouting, dogfish and the occasional codling. Summer produces mackerel, garfish, mullet, smoothhounds, dabs and dogfish.

BAIT AND TACKLE

Various cuts of mackerel or sandeel are the best all-round baits for dabs and dogfish. Frozen black or salted lugworm is also very effective for flatfish and peeler crab is best for smoothhounds.
Most anglers generally use a two or three hook paternoster rig with a 3oz or 4oz bomb shaped sinker which can slowly roll across the seabed.
Float fished slithers of fish bait works for garfish, mackerel and mullet.

Rhossili Bay, Worm's Head to Burry Holms (23).   This golden crescent of sand attracts more surfers than anglers.  However, at the right time and under the right conditions it is an area well worth a visit.  Pure sand for its entire length and no rough ground within casting distance, even at low tide.  

Rhossili beach is a caster's paradise where the only limitation is the angler and fishing outfit.  There is no need to wade out - just go in far enough to get the bait behind the third breaker.  Casting a long way out is likely to result in more flatfish than bass.  A 2 hook terminal rig is trouble free and gives scope to fish for bass or flatfish.  For bass keep the hooks above the weight and flowing into the swill behind the surf.  For flatfish put the hooks on the bottom below the weight.  The Use of a long terminal hook trace will be required for attracting the turbot and brill - These fish do like to see some movement in their prospective dinner.

A good bunch of lugworm will produce bass from the surf while ragworm will attract flatfish as well.  This is also a good venue to try some small clams on the hook with the worms.  Never overlook the cockles when digging for bait.  Cockles, razorfish and sandeels can make a difference to an otherwise blank day. Take care it can be a danderous beach to those not familar with the tidal conditions that prevail.  Here there are fierce undertows that sweep an unsuspecting angler away.  When visiting the beach from the Hillend Caravan park, Llagennith (15)  there are plenty of signs warning of these sea dangers.  Pay heed to them - it really can be a dangerous  beach. 

23. Bury Holms, is the small tidal island at the northern end of Llangennith beach.  There is less rock at low water than at Mumbles but it still provides plenty of opportunity for the rock fishing entusiast to practise his or her art.  On the seaward side of the island fine surf conditions can be found.  Try fly fishing for bass.

Enjoy, but do not forget that it is tidal and could be stuck there for hours if not prepared and alert.  Never try to swim or wade the short distance to the mainland should one become stranded. - the current is far too powerfull even for the strongest of swimmers.  Perhaps some of the healthiest and cleanest bass are to be found along the whole of Rhossili Bay.   Dabs, plaice, a few flounders and evn the prospect of turbot and brill or the likely species to be hooked.

Broughton Bay to Whitford Point.  Around the corner from Llangennith lies a very difficult stretch of coastline.   An area Swept by fierce undertows and rip tides.  A mixture of sand and rock with fish to be caught, but not many anglers fish here.  Fishing is mainly from the headland on the bay's eastern side.  Some fishing is done from the beach but in general it is a location best left alone, especially at low water.  Fishing from the beach is much safer at top tide.

The speicies around Broughton are mainly flatfish, dabs and some plaice and flonders.  The usual dogfish are around and on some occasions a ray may be caught.

Spinning with the customary lures from Broughton's promontory can catch bass and mackerel at times.  The beach is best fished at high water using lug or ragworm ledgered on a 2 hook terminal rig.  Clams and razorfish baits work well around here.

Broughton Bay is more popular with the boat fishing entusiasts.

The Burry Estuary.  The Burry Estuary can produce some fine fishing.  Unsurpassed for flatfish.  The sands and mudflats of the small villages of Wernffrwd and Crofty are best fished from low water up.  It is an area criss-crossed with 'pills' in the mud, channels that can be a few inches or many feet deep.  Geat care must be taken when fishing a flooding tide.  Always ensure that your retreit path is clear - keep an eye on the tide and make sure it does not creep in behind you.  The area really comes into its own during the autumn and winter months when the flatfish have moved in to spawn.

The old slipway at Crofty which is known as Salthouse Point is now badly eroded by the elements.  It is still possible to fish in relative safety but it is very exposed with no shelter from the wind and rain.  Some fishing is done from the bridge that crosses the river Loughour at the villages of Loughor. But the passing cars are big problem and hazard.  There is fishing to be had from the sand banks between the road and rail bridge and, some good spots can be found by walking along the shoreline towards Llanelli.

River Loughor

The most popular area for the locals are the greenbanks on the Llanelli side of the river.  But visiting anglers tend use the sand both sides of the river - bottom fishing in between the road and railway bridges.  Winter can be exellent for the flounder, best bait being the local harbour ragworm.  Summer fishing for bass, mullet, or flounder try bottom or float fishing.   Beware the crabs can be a pest when the water is warmer.

Regular species include: flounders, dabs, some plaice, bass, mullet and during the winter whiting (if cold enough).  Not so regular: turbot, brill, codling, scad, mackerel, sewing...

The only method of fishing to be used here is a plain ledger with a first choice bait of mud ragworm.  Failing these lugworm should produce good catches.  Two hooks is the simplest form and will catch many fish.  Keep both hooks below the weight so that they are on the bottom at all times.  Do not wade out as this could be dangerous should you step into a gully/pill and very often the flat fish will be behind a long distance caster.  The fish here move in with the tide as it creeps shoreward, 2lb flounders have been caught in 5 inches of water.   At the right time of the year catches can be very good with heavy bags taken.  Average fish size in some parts are over 2lb.  The village of Wernffrwd is an area that is capable of producing large bass late in the year.  Favorite bait is soft crab, ledgered close to the bottom.

24. Port Talbot Breakwaters give opportunities for rays, bass and codling.

26. Sker point & Rocks for rays, bass ,codling and turbot.

Many of you will have other marks that you have fished successfully, as there are many locations that are more difficult to get to for reasons of transport, or distance or remoteness.  If you have and would like to share with your fellow anglers then please drop a line with details to the Club.

Swansea Bay and Gower offer a treasure chest of sport.  Over 20 major centres, 25 different species common to shore fishing and each year something out of the ordinary turns up.


Fishing with GPS

 

Fishing with GPS

Go Global

Being able to find fish before you even go out on the water is one the keys to a successful day's fishing.  Looking at a map of the water and being able to read the bottom features and determine the route the fish follow to and from the feeding grounds and where the feeding grounds are from a map is important.  This way the time you spend fishing will be in the more productive areas of the sea instead of casting blindly and hoping for something to come along.  So take time and  learn to read a map properly.  Beware, plastic maps often lack true accuracy.

The lines on a map represent the depth breaks with each line showing changes in depth that graduate from shore.  You can find the break or desired depth change on amap just as you can by lookinf for it on the water.   It may be that during the warmer water seasons fish will relate to a more gradual slope or break and during colder water a sharper drop into deeper water will be their chioce.

Marine Charts

The best specialised maps are Marine Charts.  These offer information about shifting sands, sandbars, reefs, ledges and such that can be critical for productive boat fishing.  Make sure your charts are uptodate so that you don't run aground or get lost.  Once you have located the dessired place on the map, finding the location on the water becomes the next challenge. (Check out the Marine Chart website given at the bottom of the page).

Benefits of GPS for Fishing

GPS technology make your fishing trips much more rewarding.   More accurate than 'line of sight' or other navigational methods, a GPS unit tells you where you are and where you are going within a few metres.  GPS is now an essential item in the angler's arsenal.

A GPS is very handy and a good depth finder is udeful too.  Finding these places still requires some travelling time but good preplanning with a map and GPS means less wasted time.  Combine the benefits of mapping with GPS by getting digital charts or scan in paper maps with GPS mapping software and then enter way points along your planned route.

There are always changes to the bottom that are not on some older maps and these places can sometimes be great fishing spots.   Fewer people will know of these places and therefore less pressure on the fish stock there.  A GPS unit can mark these fishing hot spots so that you can find it again easily.  If you share your hot spot information giving GPS co-ordinates makes this easy to do.

Finding the right fishing spot isn't the only consideration, finding your way back home again is another, andyour GPS unit lets you do that easily.  It is better to enjoy the peace on the water and see the fish biting without worrying about the rigours of navigation.  The GPS unit provides all the navigational information you need, including position, heading, bearing, speed, time to destination and more.

GPS as Safety Tool

GPS allows you to navigate safely, even when caught in a heavy fog or other bad weather conditions.  It's easy to get turned around on the open sea, but no matter what the visibility with a GPS you know where you are and which way you are headed.   In the case of s 'man overboard' situation a GPS unit can mark the the exact place where the event occurred greatly assisting rescue crews.   GPS also allows you to easily communicate precise positions to the Coat Guard if you come across a boat in distress.  In emergencies, swift navigation can make a big difference.  GPS mapping software helps to quickly and safely navigate you to the nearest dock or port while avoiding known hazards alon the way. 

GPS Fishing Marks

Bream  51 33 745N  003 59 938W. Langland Reef (inside)  51 33 724N  004 00060W.  Langland Reef (Outer) 51 33 209N  004 00 633W.

White Oyster Ledge 51 31 159N  003 59 325W.  White Oyster Ledge (mid) 51 31 172N  003 59 210W. White Oyster ledge (midi)  51 31 189N  003 59 244W.  White Oyster Ledge (West)  51 31 126N  003 59 486W.  White Oyster Ledge (East)  51 31 228N  003 58 577W.

Inner Bank (1) 51 30 706N  004 06 361W.  Inner Bank (2) 51 30 664N  004 06 350W

St Christopher Knoll (1)  51 33 277N  004 06 265W.  St Christopher Knoll (2)  51 31 228N  004 06 265W.  St Christopher Knoll (wreck motor vessel)  51 33 217N  004 11 936W

Mixon Shoal  51 33 004N  003 58 002W.  Mixon Bouy  51 33    N  003 58 008W